Meet the Speakers!

We’re really excited about our line up of speakers for this year’s World Changers’ Summit. In case you missed it, here is a quick introduction:

Rowan Gillson

Rowan Gillson, founder of World Changers Summit, is the President and CEO of the Institute of Photographic Studies. (ipsphoto.co) He and his wife Jocelyn reside in Portland, OR, but spend much of their time on the road hosting photography workshops rooted in a Christian worldview. Rowan has traveled the world, serving as a team leader for various groups throughout Asia, Europe, and New Zealand/Australia. Rowan has hosted large events for the Institute in Basic Life Principles and served as an Assistant Staff Director at Summit Ministries. In 2010 Rowan was selected as one of 4000 Christian leaders from around the world to participate in the Third Lausanne Congress on World Evangelization in Cape Town, South Africa. (Learn more here)

Kay Hiramine

Kay is the Catalyst for Humanitarian International Services Group (HISG). Kay was born into a first generation Japanese American home. He received an International Diploma in Humanitarian Assistance (IDHA) from the University of Geneva, Fordham University, The Center for International Health and Cooperation and the Royal College of Surgeons at the University of Belfast. He has also been awarded an honorary Doctorate of Philosphy (PH.D) from Kathmandu International University in June, 2010. The doctorate degree is in the field of Philanthropy.

Kay’s distinguished career in the non-profit sector has involved starting multiple non-profits and overseening global initiatives involving millions of people and every country of the world.

Kay is one of the founders of Humanitarian International Services Group (HISG), located in Palmer Lake, CO. He has worked with NGOs, IOs, government officials, business leaders and faith based groups in humanitarian activities around the world. Kay resides with his wife Julie in Colorado Springs, Colorado. They have five daughters. (Learn more here)

 

 

Jeff Myers

Dr. Jeff Myers is president of Summit Ministries. He also serves as Distinquished Service Professor and Senior Fellow for Leadership Studies at Bryan College in Dayton, TN. Dr. Myers speaks to more than 50,000 people each year in corporations, schools, homeschool conferences, parent groups, and youth-serving organizations. Over the last decade, Dr. Myers has worked with Summit Ministries to develop cutting-edge leadership experiences in Colorado, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Alberta, Canada. Dr. Myers’ many books and video courses include Of Knights and Fair Maidens, Playpen to Podium, Secrets of Great Communicators, Secrets of the World-Changers, Secrets of Everyday Leaders, For Such a Time as This, Handoff, and Cultivate. Dr. Myers earned a Ph.D. in Communications from the University of Denver. He and his wife Danielle have four children—Graham, Emma, Cate, and Stuart—and live in Manitou Springs, CO. (Learn more here)

 

 

Randall Niles

Randall Niles is an attorney and educator who spends most of his time pursuing his passion — developing cutting-edge media to spark critical thinking and truth-seeking in a new generation. For the last seven years, Randall has served as co-founder and director of operations at www.AllAboutGOD.com, where he’s written and published hundreds of articles on comparative worldviews and Christian apologetics. When he’s not writing or speaking, Randall teaches courses at Colorado Christian University in the areas of business, law, ethics, and philosophy. Randall’s books include The Great Pursuit and What Happened to Me, which travel the virtual world via blogs and social networks such as www.AllAboutTheJourney.org. Randall’s education includes Georgetown, Oxford, and Berkeley. He lives in Colorado with his wife and three kids. (Learn more here)

 

 

Dewey Novotny

Dewey Novotny’s involvement in student ministry and leadership development spans three decades with pioneering the Hugh O’Brian Arizona Youth Leadership Seminars and launching a grassroots ministry for College and Career aged world changers. More recently he directed a Student Resource department for the Advanced Training Institute, a large home school organization, and has since founded and developed Life Purpose Planning.

Whether vocationally flying “aluminum tubes” across the Atlantic, fly-fishing in Alaska, or inspiring others to seek God’s best, he spreads contagious enthusiasm across the country. He uses his experiences as an F-16 military and commercial airline pilot to motivate young people to wholeheartedly “discover, define, develop, and deploy” into their individual, God-ordained, world-changing life purpose. (Learn more here)

 

 

John Stonestreet

John Stonestreet’s passion is to illuminate a biblical worldview for today’s culture. He’s a speaker, writer, cultural commentator, and collaborator of worldview initiatives. In his shared role with the Colson Center and Summit Ministries, John directs conferences and curriculum projects, speaks to groups nationally and internationally, consults on worldview education for schools and churches, and appears frequently on web and radio broadcasts. As the host of The Point, a daily national radio program, John provides thought-provoking commentaries on current events and life issues from a biblical worldview. John holds degrees from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (IL) and Bryan College (TN), and is the co-author of Making Sense of Your World: A Biblical Worldview. He and his wife Sarah have three daughters and a dog, and live in Colorado Springs, CO. (Learn more here)

 

 

Scott Vander Hamm

Brig. Gen. Scott A. Vander Hamm is the Commander, 509th Bomb Wing, Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo. He is responsible for the combat readiness of the Air Force’s only B-2 wing. His responsibilities include development and employment of the B-2′s combat capability as part of the Air Force’s Global Strike Task Force. His command provides logistics support for the Air Force Reserve 442nd Fighter Wing; Missouri Air National Guard 131st Bomb Wing; Missouri Army National Guard 1st Battalion, 135th Aviation Unit; and the Navy Reserve Maritime Expeditionary Security Division 13. He manages flying assets in excess of $46 billion and an annual operations and maintenance budget of $147 million. (Learn more here)

Meet Rowan Gillson

Rowan Gillson

Rowan Gillson, founder of World Changers Summit, is the President and CEO of the Institute of Photographic Studies. (ipsphoto.co) He and his wife Jocelyn reside in Portland, OR, but spend much of their time on the road hosting photography workshops rooted in a Christian worldview. Rowan has traveled the world, serving as a team leader for various groups throughout Asia, Europe, and New Zealand/Australia. Rowan has hosted large events for the Institute in Basic Life Principles and served as an Assistant Staff Director at Summit Ministries. In 2010 Rowan was selected as one of 4000 Christian leaders from around the world to participate in the Third Lausanne Congress on World Evangelization in Cape Town, South Africa.

Session

Sunday, 9:30am – Dream Big for the Glory of God (see more sessions here)

We Are Not a Conference

The peculiar thing about conferences is that the best moments happen in the cracks of the event.

Almost all of us have attended, organized, promoted, and/or spoken at countless conferences. But for being a place filled with people, it can be isolating –confirming the old adage that the loneliest place to be is in a crowd.

We love conferences, but conferences are usually a convention center full of people you can’t possibly connect with; speakers you can only meet after waiting in line; schedules that require track shoes and MREs; and crumpled up handouts that end up going through the wash while you try to sleep off your “vacation”.

Conferences work to get everyone’s face to point in one direction. But experience says that discipleship happens when we face each other.

True, getting content out to a large audience is efficient, but it’s not personal and therefore, as often as not, unhelpful. So the best moments tend to happen in the cracks. In conversations between main events. When you’re at breakfast with a friend or a late-night dinner conversation that lasts until the wait staff clear down the tables. When you find yourself standing in the line at Starbucks with one of the keynote speakers. Or in an exchange after a breakout session when everyone else has left.

Knowing that, we asked ourselves, what if the main attraction was actually something that was that attractive? Imagine an event where you could have a conversation with the speaker. Imagine an event where the other people were in your same life situations, doing what you’re doing and eager to share the lessons they’ve learned along the way. Imagine going to a conference with only the people you wanted to talk to, to connect with and collaborate.

That’s the World Changers’ Summit.

And to make that experience happen, we have three distinctive:

1. Format

Looking at the list of previous and current WCS attendees, there is a lot of experience in the room. You all are ministry leaders, small business owners, CEOs, presidents, artists, and entrepreneurs. We feel It would be a horrible waste to assemble all of that God given talent just to insist you sit quietly while somebody else talks.

So rather than follow the typical lecture format (50 minutes of lecture followed by 10 minutes of caffeinating), we’ve asked our speakers to distill their message to 30 minutes, followed by 20 minutes of round table discussion with the world changers next to you followed by 30 minutes of Q&A with the speaker.

Why? Because this event isn’t just about education, it’s about collaboration. We only have four days together and we want to hear from you.

The World Changers’ Summit is not a restaurant, with professional staff delivering menu items that you may have been able to make better at home. It’s a farmers’ market, where people who work as hard as you come together to share their passions and strengths.

2. Size

This event is small, limited to between 30-60 leaders. While that also makes it expensive, it also makes it stronger. Typically, you will only hear our speakers in a room with hundreds of people, all from incredibly diverse walks of life with as many unique questions and scenarios. Our goal is to take a segment of that group (the leaders and culture makers) and give them an opportunity to focus on their specific needs.

3. Coaches

For the special needs that remain, we’re bringing coaches. These are professionals in their respective fields who are bringing their in expertise to 30 minute, one-on-one consultations with you on legal issues, business, accounting, fundraising, publishing, SEO and web design, event management, marketing and branding.

We want to serve you with an even that is unlike any you’ve been to before. We’re hearing your stories, hearing your passion and seeing your vision. Come see that you’re not alone. Come talk with your fellow disciples. Come see what God is doing through your generation.

Click Here to Register for WCS 2013!

Posted in FAQ

Planning Your Quit

If we’re honest with ourselves, we’ll learn that our “yes” will be “yes” when our “no” becomes consistently and truly “no”.

So we have to lose our fear of “no”.

Godin writes,

“Never Quit” What a spectacularly bad piece of advice. It ranks up there with “Oh, that’s a funny dirty joke, let’s tell the teacher!” Never quite? Never quit wetting your bed? Or that job you had at Burger King in high school? Never quit selling a product that is now obsolete?

Wait a minute. Didn’t that coach say quitting was a bad idea?

Actually, quitting as a short-term strategy is bad idea.

Quitting for the long term is an excellent idea.

I think the advice giver meant to say, “Never quit something with great long-term potential just because you can’t deal with the stress of the moment.” Now that’s good advice.

We’ve talked about quitting before (see the post here) and not just because we want to give you Seth’s book, although that’s true.

Many of us were raised under the fanfare of world changing. God put us here on earth, we were told, to change it.

Many of us (though not all) really believed that; many of us (though fewer) still do.

Impassioned by this call, we became “Generation Yes”. Anything is possible and we know because we’ve tried it.

However, the mark against us is that we tend not to uphold the opposite of our “yes”. That is, we’ve learned how to say yes but often forget how to say “no” when it counts.

But quitting is a strategic move towards growth. And we as Christians, more than any other group, should know that. See if any of these ring a bell:

  • “For this reason a man shall leave his father and his mother…” (Genesis2:24)
  • “Whoever loses his life for My sake will find it.” (Matthew 16:25)
  • “They are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.” (John 17:16)
  • “Behold, for three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig tree without finding any. Cut it down! Why does it even use up the ground?” (Luke 13:7)
  • Now those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. (Galatians 5:24)

For the Christian, quitting one thing to obediently and excellently do another should be part of our spiritual DNA.

Sadly, what we often find is a community of over-committed, coffee addicts running around hoping the juice we’re trying to wring out of our dehydrated rind will count as fruit.

If the Christian community is going to be a community of obedient excellence then it’s going to have to be a community of quitters. That is a people dedicated to quitting all other callings so they can fully commit to their calling.

Thus our “yes” and “no” have to be strategic. Thoughtful. Obedient.

This leads us to an interesting conclusion, if quitting is a strategic move, it can be included in our strategic plan. To that end, Seth gives the following assignment.

Write it down. Write down under what circumstances you’re willing to quit. And when. And stick to it.

He’s absolutely right. As you sit down to plan your moves ahead, include an exit strategy.

One of the most practical ways to do this is start with your values. Have a list of uncompromisable conflicts in place. Does it take away from your family? Church? Another project?

When you say yes to something, it will costs you. As you plan, decide ahead of time what you aren’t willing to pay. And if that “yes” starts over-charging, cut it loose.

For which of you, desiring to build a tower, does not first sit down and count the cost, whether he has enough to complete it? Otherwise, when he has laid a foundation and is not able to finish, all who see it begin to mock him, saying, ‘This man began to build and was not able to finish.’ (Luke 14:28-30)

Click Here to Register for WCS 2012!